Naval Mine Warfare for U.S. Naval Forces

Sea mines have been important in naval warfare throughout history and continue to be so today. They have caused major damage to naval forces, slowed or stopped naval actions and commercial shipping, and forced the alteration of strategic and tactical plans. The threat posed by sea mines continues, and is increasing, in today’s world of inexpensive advanced electronics, nanotechnology, and multiple Read More

Mining North Vietnamese Ports

In May, 1972, U. S. forces mined North Vietnamese ports following large scale employment of North Vietnamese Army units in South Vietnam. This action completely shut down seaborne importations to North Vietnam. The logistics train needed to support these Army units was crippled by elimination of 85% of imported supplies for the North Vietnam war effort. This forced war material Read More

Lesson That Never Stays Learned

In April, 1950, Admiral Forrest P. Sherman, Chief of Naval Operations, approved a report from his planners which described mine countermeasures as “…the only countermeasures which seems to offer the possibility of being cheap enough to make peacetime readiness practical.”  The report went on to warn that “…the great danger is that if mine countermeasures continues to Read More

Mineman Who Altered World History

Herbert Henry Asquith, Prime Minister of England (1909-1916), called the Gallipoli Campaign (February 19, 1915 – March 8, 1916) the only brilliant strategy developed during World War I. The objective was to use a combined English-French fleet of obsolete warships (18 battleships, 2 semi-dreadnoughts and 2 battle-cruisers plus cruisers, destroyers and minesweepers) to drive through Read More